Quitting Smoking, Limiting Alcohol

  1. Alcohol and Older Adults

    Many older adults enjoy a glass of wine with dinner or a beer while watching the game on TV. In fact, half of Americans ages 65 and older drink alcohol. Having a drink now and then is fine—as long as you don’t overdo it.

  2. Alcohol and Your Heart

    Alcohol may have some health benefits, including lowering the risk for heart disease, but it may also lead to abusive drinking and other diseases.

  3. How to Cut Down on Drinking

    It helps to understand why and when you drink if you are going to successfully reduce the amount of alcohol you consume.

  4. Lifestyle Changes

    Living a healthier lifestyle can help to prevent heart disease. This means eliminating all tobacco, following a heart-healthy diet, and getting regular exercise.

  5. Smoking and Cardiovascular Disease

    Smokers not only have increased risk of lung disease, including lung cancer and emphysema, but also have increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and oral cancer.

  6. Smoking: Truth and Consequences

    When you smoke, toxins are carried by your blood to every organ in your body. At the same time, the carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke keeps red blood cells from carrying as much oxygen as normal.

  7. The High Cost of Smoking

    When people consider the cost of smoking, they usually focus on the cost of the cigarettes alone. But that's only the first step.

  8. Weighing the Benefits and Risks of Alcohol

    Excessive drinking can cause potentially fatal conditions, not only high blood pressure, but also damage to the brain, heart or liver; diabetes and stroke.

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