Statistics of Infectious Disease

The following statistics are the latest available from the National Center for Health Statistics (part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC) and the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases:

  • In the United States, hepatitis A rates have decreased by 92 percent since the introduction of the hepatitis A vaccine in 1995. In 2007, it was estimated that 25,000 new cases occurred in the US.

  • The number of new hepatitis B infections has declined since the 1980s. In the US, it is estimated that 800,000 to 1.4 million people have chronic hepatitis B infections. In 2007, it was estimated that 43,000 new cases were diagnosed in the United States.

  • In the US, it is estimated that 3.2 million people have chronic hepatitis C infections. In 2007, it was estimated that 17,000 new cases occurred in the United States.

  • Tuberculosis has infected one third of the world's population. In 2008, almost 13,000 new cases were reported in the United States.

  • About 36,000 people per year in the US die from influenza.

  • According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, 56,300 new cases of HIV infections occur annually in the US, and there are almost 33 million people living with HIV in the world.

  • Before the chickenpox vaccine was introduced in 1995, there were about 4 million cases of chickenpox. With vaccination, the frequency of new cases has decreased in all age groups, especially in children ages one to four years.

  • Even though the measles vaccination is now available, from 2000 to 2007, a total of 29 to 116 cases of measles were reported annually in the US.

  • The number of new cases of sexually transmitted diseases reported in the US in 2007 include:

    • Syphilis: more than 11,466

    • Chlamydia: 1,108,374

    • Gonorrhea: 355,991

  • Whooping cough affects from 5,000 to 7,000 people in the US annually. In 2007, about 10,500 new cases in the US were reported to the CDC.


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