Creeping Eruption

What is creeping eruption?

Creeping eruption is a skin infection caused by hookworms, which normally are found in dogs and cats. The parasite spreads to humans through skin contact with the eggs found in dog and cat feces on the ground. Characterized by severe itching, the infection usually appears on the feet, legs, buttocks, or back.

What are the symptoms of creeping eruption?

The following are the most common symptoms of creeping eruption. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

  • Winding, snake-like rash--usually the hookworm burrows along a tract which creates a winding rash

  • Itching

  • Blisters

The symptoms of creeping eruption may resemble other skin conditions. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis.

Treatment for creeping eruptions:

Creeping eruption may be treated with anti-parasitic drugs, such as liquid thiabendazole and other topical treatments.

Prevention

In the United States, de-worming of cats and dogs and effective public sanitation have decreased the frequency of hookworms in humans. Since the hookworm larvae enter the human body through bare feet, wearing shoes will help prevent infections.  

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