Pituitary Tumor Radiation Therapy

radiation animation

Radiation is often used to treat pituitary tumors that come back after surgery. It may also be used to treat pituitary tumors that cause symptoms that medication cannot relieve. Sometimes, if a tumor is very large, the surgeon will remove as much as safely possible (called "debulking" surgery), and then the rest of the tumor will be irradiated.

Radiation for pituitary tumors can be given in different ways. Conventional radiation is given from a machine outside the body. The radiation is directed at the pituitary and is given five times a week for several weeks with rest on weekends.

Stereotactic radiation: This is a form of radiation that precisely targets the tumor by directing beams at it from several different angles. This method makes it possible to radiate the tumor and not the entire brain. This kind of radiation cannot be used if the tumor is near important nerves, such as the optic nerve.

Proton beam radiation: This radiation uses a different type of beam than the others. It can focus directly on the pituitary tumor and may expose nearby healthy tissues to less radiation. But it is only used in a select few medical centers because it requires very specialized equipment.

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