Fractures

  1. Bone Density Test

    A bone density test measures the strength and density of your bones as you approach menopause and, when the test is repeated sometime later, can help determine how quickly you are losing bone mass and density.

  2. Cast Types and Maintenance Instructions

    The outside of a cast can be made of plaster or fiberglass. Cotton and synthetic materials line the inside of the cast to make it soft and to provide padding around bony areas, such as the wrist or elbow.

  3. Crutch Walking

    Hold the top part of the crutch firmly between the chest and the inside of the upper arm. Do not allow the top of the crutch to push up into the armpit. It is possible to damage nerves and blood vessels with constant pressure.

  4. Fractures

    A fracture is a partial or complete break in the bone. When a fracture occurs, it is classified as either open or closed.

  5. Hip Fracture

    A hip fracture is classified by the specific area of the break and the type of break(s) in the bone. It is a serious injury and requires immediate medical attention.

  6. Kyphoplasty

    Kyphoplasty is used to treat fractures in the bones of the spine in which the doctor first inflates a balloon-like device in the bone to make space which is filled with cement.

  7. New Ways to Heal Broken Bones

    Advances in orthopedic technology are helping broken and fractured bones to heal quicker and more strongly than ever before.

  8. Sports and Fractures

    Stress fractures are weak spots or small cracks in the bone caused by continuous overuse. They often occur in the foot after training for basketball, running, and other sports.

  9. Sprains, Strains, Breaks: What’s the Difference?

    If you've sprained your ankle, you know what pain is. But maybe that "sprain" was a "strain" or possibly even a "break." The amount of pain in each case can be virtually equal.

  10. Vertebroplasty

    Vertebroplasty is a procedure in which a special medical-grade cement mixture is injected into a fractured vertebra

  11. You Can Head Off Stress Fractures

    A stress fracture occurs when you increase the length or intensity of your workout too quickly.

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