Exercise

  1. Exercise and Adolescents

    Teens need at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity on most days for good health and fitness and for healthy weight during growth.

  2. Help Girls Stay Active as Teens

    The teen years often bring a sharp drop in physical activity, especially for girls.

  3. Make Exercise a Family Affair

    Like adults, children should be physically active most, if not all, days of the week.

  4. Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids

    The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Sports Medicine now say that strength training is fine for kids, as long as they are supervised and don't try to lift too much weight.

  5. Weight Training for Teens

    Once children hit puberty, and hormones make it possible to build muscle, weight training can become a part of a healthy exercise program for youths. Research suggests strength training has a lot to offer some teenagers in terms of health, fitness and fun.

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